Category Archives: social

Predictive Automotive Apps

In a previous post, “Synergistic Social Agent Network Cloud” I argued for more proactive apps. I was just reading something that is related to that topic: “Ford Hybrid’s EV+ Feature Learns and Automatically Adjusts Powertrain to Deliver More Electric-Only Driving” Also see “Proactive Agents.”

And, today I see this new product: MEMS tackles contextual awareness. The “future” may arrive one day.

The company Omron has been researching technological progress. They came up with SINIC:

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Google+?

I wrote about the need for “circles” (I called them aspects) here, but I presented it in a Facebook scenario.

The circles thing could of course be improved upon. There are a few non-symmetric aspects that could:
1. Limit the maintainability
2. Can invite future stalking scenarios.

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Proactive Agents?

I read an interesting blog post related to the topic I previously wrote about: “Synergistic Social Agent Network Cloud“.

The term Proactive Agents is mentioned by Carlos E. Perez, in “Software Development Trends and Predictions for 2011“:

Proactive Agents – For decades people have been forecasting the emergence of digital personal assistants that would actively react to the environment on one’s own behalf. The emergence of always present smart mobile devices and cloud computing shared spaces will be the catalyst for the developing of active agent based computing platforms and frameworks. At present, most computing is merely reactive, that is servicing web requests only on command of a user. Future computing will include a proactive aspect that suggests courses of actions to users. Semantic technologies like Zemanta and OpenCalais provide intelligence to writers by suggesting tags that are relevant to a written document.

Are current social networks, apps, and other mobile devices “proactive” yet?

Further Reading

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Twixt: Tweet Continuations

Just had a thought. Tweets should be extendable.

My approach, what I call Twixt©, consists of two simple methods.

  • Threaded: In this approach, a tweet being created (edited) that goes over the limit is subdivided into multiple tweets, and each resulting tweet links to the next so that a consumer of the tweet (human or process) can recreate the intended content.
  • Linked: In this method, a tweet that overflows, will be subdivided so that the created tweet points to the rest of the content on an external server.
    An advantage with the linked approach is that this same server can create conventional content and then post the linker tweet, like an RSS substitute. That’s tsweet!

Of course, this would require Twitter clients that could support this and the server infrastructure and API for the linking if required (I’m not involved in Twitter minutiae).

Example
I tweeted (s’cuse me), and in the tweet I put a link to a tiddler on a TiddlyWiki page.

Now if I knew how to link to a tweet, I could show you the tweet. Oh well, you get the whole idea.

Editing a TiddlyWiki page gave me this idea. A tiddler is very much a supercharged tweet except it’s locked into a single page, though a highly functional Single-Page Application (SPA) type. “Twixt” was just used in place of betwixt, but I’ll lie and say it stands for “TWeet Interaction eXtension”. 🙂

I was just informed on the TiddlyWiki forum about an awesome related use of TiddlyWiki see TwitterTabs.

A real implementation of Twixt would best be a server side service or cloud hosted application.

Implications
So what is the big deal? Well, you can still tweet what you had for breakfast, but it should also be easier to topple dictators too.

Further Reading

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